Er geht ins Internet, ______. Using "damit" When using "damit," you are creating a subordinate clause. They are called final clauses (Finalsätze). Sofia goes on holiday so that her daughter gets to know a new country, 1. and a subordinate clause with the verb conjugated at the end. Now,  you might wonder when you should use which one and how you can build a sentence with them. Subordinate final clauses (Finalsätze) are useful to define a goal, an objective. The only thing that changes is how they are used. If you use “damit”, the main verb of the sentence needs to be put to the end (which we like to do with conjunctions in German as you might already know). aim to answer questions about the purpose of something; why we are doing it. Luckily, you found this article because I will explain everything in detail in the following. Also, “damit” allows you to start a sentence with it, as you can see in the second example. If you use the website further, we assume your consent. Gee… thanks headline, I just said that! We use these clauses whenever we are talking about reaching a certain goal. The verb in the subordinate clause depends on the subject of the subordinate clause→, werden (3. You can put either the main clause or the subordinate clause first. use damit, ie the version with the subordinate clause and the conjugated verb at the end.. Using damit, you are also able to name two different subjects in both of your sentence parts (ich/wir). Now, that you got to know the difference between “damit” and “um … zu” you can confidently use both of them at the right time. 1. Therefore, it is not changed according to the subject as you can see in the case above. Another thing that you need to take care of is, that the verb in your sentence takes the position at the end of the sentence. After reading this article, you will know when to use “damit” or “um … zu”. :), Next grammar topic: To + nominalized verb. At some point, you're going to come across sentences that use the forms. The main and subordinate clauses have different subjects →, Sofia, ihre Sprachkenntnisse/ihre Tochter, (Sofia, her language skills / her daughter). There is a subject in the subordinate clause →, 2. Er will die neuesten Nachrichten lesen. (Ici, il n'y a qu'un seul sujet, 'ich') 1. 1.There is no subject in the subordinate clause → the subject in the subordinate clause is the same as in the main clause (Sofia). There are two different ways to say “in order to” or respectively “to” in German: “damit” and “um … zu”. However, when there are two different subjects, we can only (!) The main difference is that when you use “um … zu”, you have to use the same subject in the “um … zu” part, which y used in the main clause. If they are different you must use damit. Sentences using. As you can see in the example, “damit” can be used the same way, we would use “in order to” in English. Example : Question : Ich verdiene Geld, _____________________. If they match you can use either. forms. Though I provide all blog content for free, your support will be very much appreciated. The verb in the subordinate clause is in infinitive and at the end of the clause →. In this case we can only(!) Anyway… so, a boring simple sentence consists of an action (represented by the verb), a subject, which is the entity “doing” the action, and some other blocks of information that give answers to various questions like why, where orwhen orfor what purpose. use damit. I calledMaria today. The subject of the first clause is "ich", whereas the subject of the subordinate clause is "meine Mutter". When to use “damit” and “um … zu” in German, Showing a consequence in a German sentence | Study German Online. When the subject is the same, we can use um...zu or damit. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. “Ich gehe früh schlafen, damit wir morgen früh losfahren können”, “Damit wir morgen früh losfahren können, gehe ich früh schlafen.”. While working as an online German teacher, I realized that many students find it tricky to decide on one or the other. And if it's clear from the … I know that when the two connected sentences have the same subject, I should use um.. zu and when the subject is different damit. This conjunction has the same meaning as “damit,” and you can also start your sentence with it or put it in the middle. I was just reading a text in a german "Lehrbuch" when I saw the following sentence: "Wir haben in der Arbeit doch so ein Team-Seminar gemacht, damit wir … Also, you will need to use a “zu” which is followerd by the infinitive form of the verb (sein in our example). Damit : Ich arbeite viel, damit meine Eltern auf mich stolz sind. . Florian will Informationen holen. For example: Ich höre Musik nicht, damit meine Mutter schlafen kann. Person Plural), lernt (3. Sofia goes on holiday to recover (herself). 2. The verb in the subordinate clause is conjugated → sich, Different subjects in the main and subordinate clauses. This website uses cookies. The main difference is that when you use “um … zu”, you have to use the same subject in the “um … zu” part, which y used in the main clause. When using the conjunction "um..zu" the subject of the subordinate clause must be the same subject of the main clause, whereas when using "damit" the main and the subordinate clause can have two different subjects. Sofia goes on holiday so that her language skills improve. We can use both the. . There are two different ways to say “in order to” in German. So, if you want to use two different subjects, you need to use “damit”. “Ich gehe zum Sport, um fit zu sein.” “Um fit zu sein, gehe ich zum Sport.” This conjunction has the same meaning as “damit,” and you can also start your sentence with it or put it in the middle.
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